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Posts Tagged ‘Web 2.0’

SOMESSO - Social Media Meet Up

May 21st, 2010 Martin Raske No comments

#csmm - the Twitter Hashtag for yesterday's Social Media Meet Up in Zürich at cinema Razzia, organized by SOMESSO and Signorellfilms.

The learnings I took home:

a) it is possible to build a bank from scratch, using Web 2.0 functionalities: www.fidor.de The CEO, Matthias Kröner (@ficoba), know how to tell stories and he has to tell a very convincing one.

b) Riccardo Signorell (@signorellfilms) showed us the importance of telling strories - instead of selling products/ideas. He did this by showing many examples from all kind of different movies - from Hollywood blockbusters to Youtube perls.

Meeting in a Cinema that falls appart and talking about current and future developments in the way we interact and make business is a very cool combination. Makes you think twice.

Audience or Community?

November 24th, 2009 Martin Raske No comments

 "The difference between an audience and a community is the way the chairs are facing!"

thank you @ulrike_reinhart

Categories: All The Rest Tags:

Some Thoughts on Rating Learning Content

July 6th, 2009 Martin Raske No comments

David Wilkins writes in his very intersting post on ASTD:

Learners have always discussed and commented on the courses and classes they are taking.  And learners are usually quick to tell other learners what they think of a given class.  If learners are attending an instructor-led event, they may try to network with other learners before, during, and after the event.  Learners also expect updates about changes to a course or training class.  Today, most of these interactions happen through ad hoc, unstructured, unsearchable exchanges between individual learners.

His suggestion for a 'Wrapped Model' means to use new technologies like social networking, rating, tagging, commenting, sharing etc. as a wrapper around traditional formal training. His ideas is that this way the interactions of learners become searchable and re-usable.

David's idea of using web 2.0 technology with traditional learning is fascinating. Especially the idea of rating learning content. We know the phenomenon from many places, one of the best known is probably a famous online bookshop: If you like a book, you can give it a few stars and write a comment on it. Everybody can read your comments and the rating adds up to some kind of a social ranking of this specific book. And of course: The better the rating, the higher the chance of the book to become a bestseller.

What happens if we transfer this idea into the world of learning?

Humans are gregarious animals. We tend to follow the flock. If more than two people are doing the same, it must be right. We trust the wisdom of the crowd - sometimes even if it leads us into desaster. This is probably one of the reasons, why public rating works so well: If I see that a few people have rated a conent as being good, chances are that I will be looking at this content as well. For learning this means: If a group of people has rated a course or a web based training as being helpful, engaging, interesting or even just fun, many others will take the same course as well. For an organization that deals with learning content this approach might help to increase the demand.

Public rating brings transparency into the world of training. These days most of the time training happens behind closed doors - making some of this transparent will definitely change some of the dynamics in this field.

However, like always there are two sides of the same coin: www.spickmich.de or www.rateyourprofessors.com are public pillories that pretend to rate the quality of teachers and professors but most of the time it is used as an outlet for frustrated students who have not yet learned that learning does not happen by consuming learning content only but by contributing to it, by working on it, by adding time and effort. If I talk about rating learning content, I don't think about these kind of tools.

Rating of learning content will surely add to more transparency for both learners and facilitators if it is done with a standardized qualitative survey. In a first step it will be useful to closely manage these ratings - in terms of deleting spam (like we have to do in our blogs), maybe getting back to users and ask for clarification etc. If we do this, I am convinced that this feature will add to the learning experience.

The Value of Twitter

June 16th, 2009 Martin Raske No comments

Twittering is like hugging. Just because it's hard to measure the return on investment doesn't mean there isn't value there.

a tweet from @zappos

Categories: All The Rest, Web 2.0 Tags: ,

#140conf

June 15th, 2009 Martin Raske No comments

These days there's a big Twitter Conference going on in NYC. I can't be there, that's why I follow it on http://140live.socialapproach.com/ (great map-feature) and on @14conf

So far I don't read and hear a lot of content about twitter. But the many visitors of the conference tweet a lot about their trip to NYC and about the tweetups they plan for the pre-conference night. For the time being it rather supports what many are thinking of Twitter: A lot of irrelevant noise.

WissensWert Blog Carnival No. 5 - Why do you twitter?

June 12th, 2009 Martin Raske No comments

The question of this month's blog carnival on http://wissenswert.iwi.unisg.ch/?p=590 is "Why the heck do you twitter?"

I'm a late joiner. WhenDidYouJoinTwitter? tells me that I joined Twitter on January 16th, 2009. At this point the whole world was talking about Twitter. The newspapers were full of it and even on TV they discussed microblogging. I am a late joiner, but I quickly enjoyed it.

I twitter because...

...I wanted to find out about all kind of social media tools. In early 2009 I signed up for all kind of web 2.0 tools that I could find, just to find out, what was going on in the world. I had the impression that by concentrating on traditional e-learning for quite a while - ten years actually - I had missed some recent developments in the real world and I still feel too young to be left behind.

...I realized that it does not take much of my time and still I could start playing a role in the web 2.0 community. A tiny one, yes, but a role. And very early I realized that it is so easy to get in contact with people you don't even know in person by using Twitter. And that brings me to the next reason.

...Connecting with people you know and people you don't know was never easier.

...Virtual communities are vital communities. I still hear many people say: I would rather meet someone in person than to only be in virtual contact with them. And I always say to them: Why do you think this is an either-or decision? For me it's an AND-situation.

...I believe that companies could profit from it in many ways.

...I am a gadget guy. I have my BlackBerry and my cell phone always with me. And I have a netbook and a laptop and a desktop and another laptop and an old laptop too. In other words: I am almost always online - why not use this fact to talk to the world - if the world wants to listen?

...Even though everybody does it, not many people do it - and where I come from, you don't find many tweeting birds. Which makes me an early bird even though I am a late joiner - nice contradiction.

...It's fun to talk to the world and thinking that maybe someone even reads my thoughts.

...I have had a few feedbacks now from vendors and service providers who want to do business with me and who know a lot of what I think and what I need and what I don't like. And what's really funny: They even told me: 'Don't put me on your Twitter after our meeting.' Isn't that fun? Makes you feel very powerful.

...It's much easier to let my friends know what I do - if they would want to know.

...I just feel I should be part of the 1% that contributes to building our www.

...Otherwise nobody would ever find my blog.